How to survive winter with breakout skin

Beautiful happy Woman In elegant winter hat and scarf on White Background

Beautiful happy Woman In elegant winter hat and scarf on White Background

1. Get EASY ON THE HOT WATER

Since I personally relocated back to Canada when I was 18, I’ve had issues with eczema, and I discover it’s specially problematical when the temperature turns cold. For a long time, I (ineffectively) attempted to manage this with over-the-counter products, however I eventually accepted defeat and searched for help from a skin doctor. I can’t recall the details of what the doctor told me, but I do remember getting a lecture about utilizing hot water on my body as it removes the skin of the protective oils. While I miss out on the comforting feeling of taking a great, hot shower or bath at the end of long day, I must confess my limited, tepid showers have gone a long way in keeping off dried, flaky, and itchy skin.

2. Purchase A Air humidifier

We purchased a great humidifier right after our daughter was born, and I can’t say enough advantages to it. It calms my skin, helps with my husband’s winter nose bleeds, and lessens hair static. Who is going to complain about this?

3. Use GLOVES

Right after the winter weather hits, I start getting little splits on my hands. Those are the most annoying and painful things EVER, plus they usually require a really long time to recover, especially because I’m a SAHM who’s regularly cooking food and cleaning, you understand? However after making a conscious efforts to put on warm gloves every time I left the home last winter, as well as putting on rubber gloves while doing the dishes, I noticed an evident reducing of the quantity of those awful breaks. And on the evenings whenever my hands were really raw and irritated, I’d slap a lot of moisturising lotion on my hands before going to sleep, and then sleep with a set of cotton gloves over top. It actually worked well! I’ve tried out TONS of different creams through the years, and have their own pluses and minuses, but my MIL recently purchased me a tube of L’Occitane Shea Butter Hand Creamand I am IN LOVE with it.

4. GET Sufficient SLEEP

While not directly related with dry skin, I find sleep is important in helping me get through the winter months. It doesn’t only produce more vitality and make me much more patient when facing The Trying Threes, it also makes my skin look and feel healthier, increases my immune system, and maintains my winter weight gain under control. I’m serious!

5. Hydrate

I remember when I read somewhere that the ideal time to moisturize your skin is instantly after showering, so I made this part of my morning schedule, and I attempt to make sure to put on an additional layer of cream to my trouble spots (arms, legs, elbows, and heels) before going to sleep. I don’t use anything expensive – just anything on sale at our nearby drugstore – but I stay away from moisturizers with a ton of fragrance in them as I find they upset my skin even more.

6. BREAK OUT THE BABY OIL

I have not used skin oils, but a friend of mine slathers herself with baby oil in the bath each morning (don’t get worried – she rinses it off) and swears it does magic in fighting dried out, itchy, flakey skin. So if you’re seriously struggling, you might want to give her tip a try!

7. Scrub

I always used to think exfoliating dried-out skin will be irritating, however through the years I’ve learned that it’s possible to eliminate dead skin cells without scrubbing, and that it’s essential to scrub allowing moisture into your skin.

For my body, I simply use a loofah with my best body wash, in case you’re searching for something a little more fancy, I’ve heard advantages of Tree Hut Shea Sugar Scrub.

My face is a different story. I’m not a lover of exfoliating scrubs as I’m prone to skin breakouts, so I stay with my Conair True Glow Sonic Advantage Facial Cleansing Brush. It’s suitable for removing dead skin cells and unclogging my skin pores, and it has 3 different speeds so I could modify it depending on how delicate my skin is feeling.

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